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Undercover Hardscape Installation | Retaining wall
Undercover Hardscape Installation

Installing the undercover hardscape light (step by step)

 The VOLT® Undercover Hardscape light is a rugged, solid brass landscape lighting fixture that provides a wonderful and elegant solution for illuminating an area where a typical path or area landscape light would not be possible. 

Applications:

Columns: In recent years, the landscape design industry has moved more towards segmental block and pavers over traditional stone and mortar for many patio and wall installations due to the relatively lower cost of materials and ease of installation. Columns near entryways and garden spaces are becoming far more commonplace in everyday garden spaces. In years past, you would typically see a bright post light mounted on top of a column. We professionals in the landscape lighting industry refer to these lights as “glare bombs”. You know the ones, when you are sitting on a friends deck and you have to shield your eyes because of that awful glare. Yes, they are a nuisance. The hardscape light is completely different. It hides its light source and softly, bathes the stone down along the face of the column and onto the surrounding walkways or landscape that surround it where you really need it. 

Walls: The hardscape light is also a great solution for illuminating a patio space or walkway that may extend right up to a sitting or retaining wall. The soft diffused glow from the hardscape light that is mounted into one of these walls, will softly broadcast it’s light out onto the path way or patio space where a typical path light just can’t be placed. This will make those hard surface areas much more accessible and enjoyable in the evening hours. If the wall stone is quite interesting, the hardscape light is a great way to highlight the unique qualities of the wall material. 

For this project you will need the following tools: 
A. Tape measure 
B. Marking pencil or Sharpie marker 
C. Masonry Chisel and mini-sledge hammer 
D. 4” or 4-1/2” angle grinder w/ diamond blade 
E. Hammer drill with a ¼” masonry drill bit. 
F. Caulking gun and a block adhesive 
G. Philips head screwdriver 

Installation: *note- for the following installation instructions, I will be referring to working with segmental stone block. 

Retaining Wall: Using the hardscape light is a great way to accent retaining walls and add some extra light in your landscape. (Fig. 1)
 

A. The first step is to layout the desired placement for your new lights. I typically like to space mine between 6’-7’ apart. Use a sharpie or pencil to mark the center point of each light. (Fig. 2)
 hardscape lighting 2

B. Take your masonry chisel and stick it into a gap between the bottom of the capstone and the top of the stone below it. Begin hammering the chisel and advancing it into the gap. (*Note- if the chisel does not want to drive into the gap, try a different spot and begin chiseling again.) As the chisel advances into the crack, you will begin to feel the glue break away as the stone lifts free. (Fig. 3) 
hardscape lighting 3

C. Once you have unboxed the light, set the center of the light (where the cord comes out of the back of the fixture) on the mark you made earlier. Take your pencil and mark a line from the front of the stone (by the fixture) to the back of the stone (by the dirt). This will be the line we will score with our grinder for the cable to lay in. (Fig. 4.) 

D. Take your 4” or 4-1/2” grinder with a diamond blade and begin scoring the stone on the line you marked. You will want the groove to me at least ½-3/4” wide and deep. This will be the slot you will put the wire in when securing your light. The slot must be deep enough to completely hold the wire. If the wire is sticking up above the slot at all, the top stone will not sit flush against the stone next to it when you go to put the caps back on. (Fig. 5) 
hardscape lighting 5

E. Push the brass wire sleeve all the way up tight to the back of the fixture and set the light in place with the wire laying in the slot. Take a pencil and mark the location of the holes to be drilled on the back of the fixture plate. (*Note- if you do not have the proper tools for drilling and securing the fixture in place, you can forego fastening the fixture in place. Simply squirt the landscape block adhesive on the top stone making sure to keep it a good 2” or more back from any edges it could ooze out of. Set the back plate of the light in a good dab of glue and set the top capstones in place. The weight of the caps will hold the light in place until it is dry. – This is not the recommended way, but it is an option). (Fig. 6) 
hardscape lighting 6

F. Take your hammer drill with a ¼” masonry bit and begin drilling the holes for the masonry anchors. You will want to drill these a good ¾-1” deep. Blow all the dust out of the holes and insert the plastic anchors. (Fig. 7)
hardscape lighting 7
 
G. Screw the fixture in place with the screws provided. This is the best way to secure the fixture to the stone. (Fig. 8) 
hardscape lighting 8

H. Your fixture is installed and ready for wiring. (Fig. 9)
hardscape lighting 9
 
I. Strip the wire ends and make a waterproof connection. Bury the wire and connection in the dirt behind the wall. (Fig. 10)
hardscape lighting 10
 
J. Sweep of the top of stones until they are relatively free of dust and grit. Squirt a good dab of masonry/block adhesive on the top block around the light. (Fig. 11)
hardscape lighting 11
 
K. Set the capstones back into their original location and give them a little tap. This completes the installation of the hardscape light in a retaining wall. (Fig. 12)
hardscape lighting 12
 

hardscape lighting 13
Freestanding wall: Adding the hardscape light to a freestanding or sitting wall is a great way to
get light in some of those more inaccessible places. The steps are very similar to the retaining wall with a few exceptions.  




A. With the capstones removed, layout the desired placement for your new lights. I typically like to space mine between 6’-7’ apart. Use a sharpie or pencil to mark the center point of each light. (*Note- you will only mark to the center of the stone where the wire is running for this application) (Fig. 14) 
hardscape lighting 14

B. You will now need to cut the wire about 7-8” to one side or the other from the line we are going to score with the grinder. Move the 2 ends of the wire out of the way so they are not damaged when we use the grinder. (Fig. 15) 
hardscape lighting 15

C. Take your 4” or 4-1/2” grinder with a diamond blade and begin scoring the stone on the line you marked. You will want the groove to me at least ½-3/4” wide and deep. This will be the slot you will put the wire in when securing your light. The slot must be deep enough to completely hold the wire. If the wire is sticking up above the slot at all, the top stone will not sit flush against the stone next to it when you go to put the caps back on. Only score back to the line where the main wire is running. Widen out a gap where you cut the wire. We will need to make our connection here. With the grinder, widen out a spot for the connection that is roughly 4-5” long, 2” wide and about 1’to1-1/2” deep. (Fig. 16) 
hardscape lighting 16

D. Fasten the fixture to the stone with the provided hardware. See details in Retaining wall instructions. E. Strip the cable ends and make your connections so that they will fit in the slot you cut out for them. Using adhesive lined, heat shrink connectors are the best solution for keeping the finished connection compact and waterproof. Once the connections are made, slide the sleeves over the connections and begin shrinking them in place by using a butane torch or heat gun to shrink the tube in place around the connection. (Fig. 17)
hardscape lighting 17
 
F. Sweep of the top of stones until they are relatively free of dust and grit. Squirt a good dab of masonry/block adhesive on the top block around the light. (Fig. 18)
hardscape lighting 18
 
G. Set the capstones back into their original location and give them a little tap. This completes the installation of the hardscape light in a freestanding retaining wall. (Fig. 19)
hardscape lighting 19

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